Category Archives: wwi poetry

“Preparations For Victory,” Edmund Blunden

TweetPreparations For Victory My soul, dread not the pestilence that hags The valley; flinch not you, my body young. At these great shouting smokes and snarling jags Of fiery iron; as yet may not be flung The dice that claims … Continue reading

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“Two Hundred Years After,” Siegfried Sassoon

TweetTwo Hundred Years After Trudging by Corbie Ridge one winter’s night, (Unless old hearsay memories tricked his sight) Along the pallid edge of the quiet sky He watched a nosing lorry grinding on, And straggling files of men; when these … Continue reading

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“The Kaiser and Belgium,” Stephen Phillips

TweetThe Kaiser and Belgium He said: “Thou petty people, let me pass. What canst thou do but bow to me and kneel?” But sudden a dry land caught fire like grass, And answer hurtled but from shell and steel. He … Continue reading

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“Princeton May, 1917,” Alfred Noyes

TweetPrinceton May 1917 Here Freedom stood by slaughtered friend and foe, And, ere the wrath paled or that sunset died, Looked through the ages; then, with eyes aglow, Laid them to wait that future, side by side. (Lines for a … Continue reading

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“Jimmy Doane,” Rowland Thirlmere

TweetJimmy Doane Often I think of you, Jimmy Doane,— You who, light-heartedly, came to my house Three autumns, to shoot and to eat a grouse! As I sat apart in this quiet room, My mind was full of the horror … Continue reading

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“The City’s Oldest Known Survivor of the Great War,” James Doyle

TweetRead The City’s Oldest Known Survivor of the Great War by James Doyle here.

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“The Choice,” Rudyard Kipling

TweetThe Choice 1917 (The American Spirit Speaks) T0 the judge of Right and Wrong With Whom fulfilment lies Our purpose and our power belong, Our faith and sacrifice. Let Freedom’s Land rejoice! Our ancient bonds are riven; Once more to … Continue reading

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“To My Brother,” Siegfried Sassoon

TweetTo My Brother Give me your hand, my brother, search my face; Look in these eyes lest I should think of shame; For we have made an end of all things base. We are returning by the road we came. … Continue reading

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“The Dragon and the Undying,” Siegfried Sassoon

TweetThe Dragon and the Undying All night the flares go up; the Dragon sings And beats upon the dark with furious wings; And, stung to rage by his own darting fires, Reaches with grappling coils from town to town; He … Continue reading

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“Absolution,” Siegfried Sassoon

TweetAbsolution The anguish of the earth absolves our eyes Till beauty shines in all that we can see. War is our scourge; yet war has made us wise, And, fighting for our freedom, we are free. Horror of wounds and … Continue reading

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